Generalist or Specialist — welcome to the PaintDrip Model

  1. handoffs — as each specialist group is responsible for a part of the process and does not have a holistic view — more often than not — we have incomplete specs, layout and interfaces having to go back and forth in the "software production line". I've seen cases where this process took the team's lead time to months: what certainly influences the team's health.
  2. silos — in a factory organization with specialists team the tendency is that one team does not have empathy to others. Teams do not have tangible shared common goals, thus they end up not creating the necessary empathy fot other "specialist areas" problems. One of the aspects I observe when I am exposed to software engineering teams is how the several groups interact. A good test to see how team organization influences in that is what I call "the lunch test". In a team with specialist teams — in general: frontends have lunch with frontends, backends have lunch with backends, QAs have lunch with QAs, and so forth. In my experience, this dynamic — together with the lack of knowledge of other team's work — creates "psychological fences", communication problems arise, and the quality of the software ends up being low.
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